Edward Fruitman, MD
1451 Broadway
Hewlett, NY 11557
(516) 295-4867

Day

December 17, 2013

NEBA: First Brain-Wave Test for ADHD Approved by FDA

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recently approved the first brain-wave test to help diagnose attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents aged 6 to 17 years, the agency announced.

The device, called Neuropsychiatric EEG-Based Assessment Aid (NEBA) System, is a  noninvasive test, based on electroencephalogram (EEG) technology. The system computes the ratio of theta and beta brain waves in 15 to 20 minutes, which can be used to help diagnose/or reverse diagnose ADD/ADHD in children and adolescents. Children and adolescents with ADHD have a higher theta-beta ratio than those who do not have the disorder.

Together with a complete medical and psychological workup, the NEBA System can help confirm a diagnosis of ADHD or a decision to focus further testing on ADHD or other conditions with similar symptoms, according to the FDA.

“The NEBA System along with other clinical information may help healthcare providers more accurately determine if ADHD is the cause of a behavioral problem,” Christy Foreman, director of the Office of Device Evaluation at the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said in a news release.

The agency based its decision to approve the NEBA System in part on a clinical study of 275 children and adolescents with attention or behavioral issues. Clinicians evaluated all of them using the new brain-wave test along with standard diagnostic protocols and physical exams. An independent panel of ADHD experts reviewed the findings to determine whether each patient satisfied the criteria for ADHD or another condition. The study showed that adding the brain-wave test to a clinical assessment helped clinicians make a more accurate ADHD diagnosis than if they had performed only the clinical assessment.

The NEBA System is made by NEBA Health, in Augusta, Georgia.

The NEBA System is now available at South Shore Neuropsychiatric Center in Hewlett, NY. Under the supervision of Medical Director, Edward Fruitman, MD, children and adolescents can be tested and the risk of ADD/ADHD misdiagnosis will be decreased exponentially. For more information call the office of Dr. Edward Fruitman (516)295-4867.

TMS Could Help Treat Chronic Dizziness

Researchers from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine believe that they have located a specific site in the human brain that could be one of the sources of dizziness and spatial disorientation.

While dizziness can also be linked to damage to the inner ear, or to other senses such as vision, neurology instructor Dr. Amir Kheradmand and his colleagues report that they have discovered a region of the brain that plays a vital role in our subconscious awareness of which way is up and which way is down.

Their study, which appears online in the journal Cerebral Cortex, found that some causes of dizziness, unsteadiness and “floating” could be linked to that region in the parietal cortex.

The study authors opted to focus their analysis on the right parietal cortex, as research on stroke victims with balance problems has suggested that damage to that region of the brain was directly involved with upright perception.

They recruited eight healthy subjects, placing each in a dark room and showing them lines that were illuminated on a screen. Dr. Kheradmand’s team then had the study participants report the orientation of each line by rotating a dial to the left, the right, or straight ahead.

The subjects then received (TMS) – an FDA-approved treatment for depression and which “painlessly and noninvasively delivers electromagnetic currents to precise locations in the brain.”

Each individual had a TMS coil placed behind the ear and against the scalp across the right parietal lobe. The subjects received 600 electromagnetic pulses over the course of 40 seconds, and at the end of each session, they were asked a second time to show the researchers which way the illuminated line was positioned. At the end of the study, all of the subjects reported that his or her sense of being upright had been altered in the same way after TMS was administered in the same location in the parietal cortex.

According to Kheradmand, his team’s findings suggest that this form of stimulation could be used to treat chronic dizziness. “If we can disrupt upright perception in healthy people using TMS, it might also be possible to use TMS to fix dysfunction in the same location in people with dizziness and spatial disorientation,” he said.

FDA approves TMS device to relieve migraine pain

FoxNews.com

694940094001_1409784734001_640-brain.jpgThose who suffer from debilitating migraines may soon be able receive an outpatient procedure that can help alleviate their pain, as reported by Nature World News.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved a TMS device for people who suffer from migraines that are preceded by an aura – characterized by a tingling sensation in the extremities and flashes of light or blind spots in a person’s vision. The device uses magnetic energy to stimulate the occipital cortex – an area of the brain involved in visual processing – in order to alleviate migraine pain.

In a trial conducted by the FDA, 201 migraine sufferers tested the device when they experienced head pain. Overall, 38 percent of patients using the device experienced relief from migraine pain within two hours, compared to just 17 percent of people who were given a fake version of the device.

While the TMS has not been proven to completely eliminate all migraine symptoms, it does help relieve migraine pain. The FDA noted that the device doesn’t provide relief for other symptoms of migraines, including  sensitivity to light, sensitivity to sound and nausea.