Edward Fruitman, MD
1451 Broadway
Hewlett, NY 11557
(516) 295-4867

KETAMINE AND DEPRESSION

by Alexis King

DEPRESSION: Depression can come in many forms, but when the symptoms begin to interfere with people’s daily lives these feelings become an illness. Signs of depression include feelings of hopelessness or guilt, loss of interest in activities that used to be enjoyable, thoughts of suicide, and many more. Some people have minor bouts of depression, but major depressive disorder can be disabling. Other forms of depression are postpartum depression, which occurs after giving birth, and seasonal affective disorder, which comes on during the winter months due to lack of natural sunlight. Medications and psychotherapy may help to alleviate depression symptoms, but are ineffective in helping some individuals.

KETAMINE: The drug ketamine was first developed in 1963 to be used as an anesthetic in humans as well as animals. When used for medical purposes, ketamine comes as a liquid that is injected into patients and is chemically similar to PCP. Although doctors and veterinarians continue to administer the drug as an anesthetic, ketamine is also used recreationally as a “street drug.” Typically snorted or ingested in powder form, ketamine has been known to cause dream-like states and hallucinations. When taken in large amounts ketamine can cause an effect called the “K-hole” in which people experience an inescapable, often terrifying out-of-body experience.

MEDICAL BREAKTHROUGH: A new study, conducted by researchers at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, shows that the experimental party drug, ketamine, can alleviate depression symptoms in just hours. The drug was shown to quickly reduce depression in participants after just one 40-minute IV dose. Most medications available today can take days, if not weeks, to reduce symptoms. The drug also has long-lasting results. After one week, 46 percent of the ketamine-assigned patients still reported reduced depression symptoms after taking the ketamine, compared to 18 percent in the placebo group. Although the ketamine has obvious benefits, it is still a hallucinogenic drug that can be very dangerous if not used under the supervision of a trained medical doctor.

For more information about the services we offer, please visit us at South Shore Neuropsychiatric Center.

About the Author
Dr. Edward Fruitman graduated from the University of Michigan with a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology and Bachelor of Arts in Psychology. He went on to receive his Doctor of Medicine (MD) degree from Michigan State University, College of Human Medicine. Dr. Fruitman completed his residency at Einstein/Montefiore. He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology.

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