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dizziness

TMS Could Help Treat Chronic Dizziness

Researchers from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine believe that they have located a specific site in the human brain that could be one of the sources of dizziness and spatial disorientation.

While dizziness can also be linked to damage to the inner ear, or to other senses such as vision, neurology instructor Dr. Amir Kheradmand and his colleagues report that they have discovered a region of the brain that plays a vital role in our subconscious awareness of which way is up and which way is down.

Their study, which appears online in the journal Cerebral Cortex, found that some causes of dizziness, unsteadiness and “floating” could be linked to that region in the parietal cortex.

The study authors opted to focus their analysis on the right parietal cortex, as research on stroke victims with balance problems has suggested that damage to that region of the brain was directly involved with upright perception.

They recruited eight healthy subjects, placing each in a dark room and showing them lines that were illuminated on a screen. Dr. Kheradmand’s team then had the study participants report the orientation of each line by rotating a dial to the left, the right, or straight ahead.

The subjects then received (TMS) – an FDA-approved treatment for depression and which “painlessly and noninvasively delivers electromagnetic currents to precise locations in the brain.”

Each individual had a TMS coil placed behind the ear and against the scalp across the right parietal lobe. The subjects received 600 electromagnetic pulses over the course of 40 seconds, and at the end of each session, they were asked a second time to show the researchers which way the illuminated line was positioned. At the end of the study, all of the subjects reported that his or her sense of being upright had been altered in the same way after TMS was administered in the same location in the parietal cortex.

According to Kheradmand, his team’s findings suggest that this form of stimulation could be used to treat chronic dizziness. “If we can disrupt upright perception in healthy people using TMS, it might also be possible to use TMS to fix dysfunction in the same location in people with dizziness and spatial disorientation,” he said.